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Coenzyme Q10


Coenzyme Q10 - Q refers to the quinone chemical group, and 10 refers to the number of isoprenyl chemical subunits in its tail.

This oil-soluble, vitamin-like substance is present in most eukaryotic cells, primarily in the mitochondria. It is a component of the electron transport chain and participates in aerobic cellular respiration, generating energy in the form of ATP. Ninety-five percent of the human body.s energy is generated this way.[1][2] Therefore, those organs with the highest energy requirements.such as the heart, liver and kidney.have the highest CoQ10 concentrations.[3][4][5]

There are three redox states of coenzyme Q10: fully oxidized (ubiquinone), semiquinone (ubisemiquinone), and fully reduced (ubiquinol). The capacity of this molecule to exist in a completely oxidized form and a completely reduced form enables it to perform its functions in the electron transport chain and as an antioxidant respectively.

References



. Ref: ^ Ernster, L; Dallner, G (1995). "Biochemical, physiological and medical aspects of ubiquinone function". Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1271 (1): 195.204. PMID 7599208.

. ^ Dutton, PL; Ohnishi, T; Darrouzet, E; Leonard, MA; Sharp, RE; Cibney, BR; Daldal, F; Moser, CC (2000). "4 Coenzyme Q oxidation reduction reactions in mitochondrial electron transport". In Kagan, VE; Quinn, PJ. Coenzyme Q: Molecular mechanisms in health and disease. Boca Raton: CRC Press. pp. 65.82.

. ^ Okamoto, T; Matsuya, T; Fukunaga, Y; Kishi, T; Yamagami, T (1989). "Human serum ubiquinol-10 levels and relationship to serum lipids". International journal for vitamin and nutrition research. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal international de vitaminologie et de nutrition 59 (3): 288.92. PMID 2599795.

. ^ Aberg, F; Appelkvist, EL; Dallner, G; Ernster, L (1992). "Distribution and redox state of ubiquinones in rat and human tissues". Archives of biochemistry and biophysics 295 (2): 230.4. doi:10.1016/0003-9861(92)90511-T. PMID 1586151.

^ Shindo, Y; Witt, E; Han, D; Epstein, W; Packer, L (1994). "Enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants in epidermis and dermis of human skin". The Journal of investigative dermatology 102 (1): 122.4. doi:10.1111/1523-1747.ep12371744. PMID 8288904.



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